Struct image::ImageBuffer[][src]

pub struct ImageBuffer<P: Pixel, Container> { /* fields omitted */ }

Generic image buffer

Methods

impl<P, Container> ImageBuffer<P, Container> where
    P: Pixel + 'static,
    P::Subpixel: 'static,
    Container: Deref<Target = [P::Subpixel]>, 
[src]

Contructs a buffer from a generic container (for example a Vec or a slice)

Returns None if the container is not big enough

Returns the underlying raw buffer

The width and height of this image.

The width of this image.

The height of this image.

Returns an iterator over the pixels of this image.

Enumerates over the pixels of the image. The iterator yields the coordinates of each pixel along with a reference to them.

Gets a reference to the pixel at location (x, y)

Panics

Panics if (x, y) is out of the bounds (width, height).

impl<P, Container> ImageBuffer<P, Container> where
    P: Pixel + 'static,
    P::Subpixel: 'static,
    Container: Deref<Target = [P::Subpixel]> + DerefMut
[src]

Returns an iterator over the mutable pixels of this image.

Enumerates over the pixels of the image. The iterator yields the coordinates of each pixel along with a mutable reference to them.

Gets a reference to the mutable pixel at location (x, y)

Panics

Panics if (x, y) is out of the bounds (width, height).

Puts a pixel at location (x, y)

Panics

Panics if (x, y) is out of the bounds (width, height).

impl<P, Container> ImageBuffer<P, Container> where
    P: Pixel<Subpixel = u8> + 'static,
    Container: Deref<Target = [u8]>, 
[src]

Saves the buffer to a file at the path specified.

The image format is derived from the file extension. Currently only jpeg and png files are supported.

impl<P: Pixel + 'static> ImageBuffer<P, Vec<P::Subpixel>> where
    P::Subpixel: 'static, 
[src]

Creates a new image buffer based on a Vec<P::Subpixel>.

Constructs a new ImageBuffer by copying a pixel

Constructs a new ImageBuffer by repeated application of the supplied function. The arguments to the function are the pixel's x and y coordinates.

Creates an image buffer out of an existing buffer. Returns None if the buffer is not big enough.

Consumes the image buffer and returns the underlying data as an owned buffer

Methods from Deref<Target = [P::Subpixel]>

Returns the number of elements in the slice.

Examples

let a = [1, 2, 3];
assert_eq!(a.len(), 3);

Returns true if the slice has a length of 0.

Examples

let a = [1, 2, 3];
assert!(!a.is_empty());

Returns the first element of the slice, or None if it is empty.

Examples

let v = [10, 40, 30];
assert_eq!(Some(&10), v.first());

let w: &[i32] = &[];
assert_eq!(None, w.first());

Returns a mutable pointer to the first element of the slice, or None if it is empty.

Examples

let x = &mut [0, 1, 2];

if let Some(first) = x.first_mut() {
    *first = 5;
}
assert_eq!(x, &[5, 1, 2]);

Returns the first and all the rest of the elements of the slice, or None if it is empty.

Examples

let x = &[0, 1, 2];

if let Some((first, elements)) = x.split_first() {
    assert_eq!(first, &0);
    assert_eq!(elements, &[1, 2]);
}

Returns the first and all the rest of the elements of the slice, or None if it is empty.

Examples

let x = &mut [0, 1, 2];

if let Some((first, elements)) = x.split_first_mut() {
    *first = 3;
    elements[0] = 4;
    elements[1] = 5;
}
assert_eq!(x, &[3, 4, 5]);

Returns the last and all the rest of the elements of the slice, or None if it is empty.

Examples

let x = &[0, 1, 2];

if let Some((last, elements)) = x.split_last() {
    assert_eq!(last, &2);
    assert_eq!(elements, &[0, 1]);
}

Returns the last and all the rest of the elements of the slice, or None if it is empty.

Examples

let x = &mut [0, 1, 2];

if let Some((last, elements)) = x.split_last_mut() {
    *last = 3;
    elements[0] = 4;
    elements[1] = 5;
}
assert_eq!(x, &[4, 5, 3]);

Returns the last element of the slice, or None if it is empty.

Examples

let v = [10, 40, 30];
assert_eq!(Some(&30), v.last());

let w: &[i32] = &[];
assert_eq!(None, w.last());

Returns a mutable pointer to the last item in the slice.

Examples

let x = &mut [0, 1, 2];

if let Some(last) = x.last_mut() {
    *last = 10;
}
assert_eq!(x, &[0, 1, 10]);

Returns a reference to an element or subslice depending on the type of index.

  • If given a position, returns a reference to the element at that position or None if out of bounds.
  • If given a range, returns the subslice corresponding to that range, or None if out of bounds.

Examples

let v = [10, 40, 30];
assert_eq!(Some(&40), v.get(1));
assert_eq!(Some(&[10, 40][..]), v.get(0..2));
assert_eq!(None, v.get(3));
assert_eq!(None, v.get(0..4));

Returns a mutable reference to an element or subslice depending on the type of index (see get) or None if the index is out of bounds.

Examples

let x = &mut [0, 1, 2];

if let Some(elem) = x.get_mut(1) {
    *elem = 42;
}
assert_eq!(x, &[0, 42, 2]);

Returns a reference to an element or subslice, without doing bounds checking.

This is generally not recommended, use with caution! For a safe alternative see get.

Examples

let x = &[1, 2, 4];

unsafe {
    assert_eq!(x.get_unchecked(1), &2);
}

Returns a mutable reference to an element or subslice, without doing bounds checking.

This is generally not recommended, use with caution! For a safe alternative see get_mut.

Examples

let x = &mut [1, 2, 4];

unsafe {
    let elem = x.get_unchecked_mut(1);
    *elem = 13;
}
assert_eq!(x, &[1, 13, 4]);

Returns a raw pointer to the slice's buffer.

The caller must ensure that the slice outlives the pointer this function returns, or else it will end up pointing to garbage.

Modifying the container referenced by this slice may cause its buffer to be reallocated, which would also make any pointers to it invalid.

Examples

let x = &[1, 2, 4];
let x_ptr = x.as_ptr();

unsafe {
    for i in 0..x.len() {
        assert_eq!(x.get_unchecked(i), &*x_ptr.offset(i as isize));
    }
}

Returns an unsafe mutable pointer to the slice's buffer.

The caller must ensure that the slice outlives the pointer this function returns, or else it will end up pointing to garbage.

Modifying the container referenced by this slice may cause its buffer to be reallocated, which would also make any pointers to it invalid.

Examples

let x = &mut [1, 2, 4];
let x_ptr = x.as_mut_ptr();

unsafe {
    for i in 0..x.len() {
        *x_ptr.offset(i as isize) += 2;
    }
}
assert_eq!(x, &[3, 4, 6]);

Swaps two elements in the slice.

Arguments

  • a - The index of the first element
  • b - The index of the second element

Panics

Panics if a or b are out of bounds.

Examples

let mut v = ["a", "b", "c", "d"];
v.swap(1, 3);
assert!(v == ["a", "d", "c", "b"]);

Reverses the order of elements in the slice, in place.

Examples

let mut v = [1, 2, 3];
v.reverse();
assert!(v == [3, 2, 1]);

Returns an iterator over the slice.

Examples

let x = &[1, 2, 4];
let mut iterator = x.iter();

assert_eq!(iterator.next(), Some(&1));
assert_eq!(iterator.next(), Some(&2));
assert_eq!(iterator.next(), Some(&4));
assert_eq!(iterator.next(), None);

Returns an iterator that allows modifying each value.

Examples

let x = &mut [1, 2, 4];
for elem in x.iter_mut() {
    *elem += 2;
}
assert_eq!(x, &[3, 4, 6]);

Returns an iterator over all contiguous windows of length size. The windows overlap. If the slice is shorter than size, the iterator returns no values.

Panics

Panics if size is 0.

Examples

let slice = ['r', 'u', 's', 't'];
let mut iter = slice.windows(2);
assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['r', 'u']);
assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['u', 's']);
assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['s', 't']);
assert!(iter.next().is_none());

If the slice is shorter than size:

let slice = ['f', 'o', 'o'];
let mut iter = slice.windows(4);
assert!(iter.next().is_none());

Returns an iterator over chunk_size elements of the slice at a time. The chunks are slices and do not overlap. If chunk_size does not divide the length of the slice, then the last chunk will not have length chunk_size.

See exact_chunks for a variant of this iterator that returns chunks of always exactly chunk_size elements.

Panics

Panics if chunk_size is 0.

Examples

let slice = ['l', 'o', 'r', 'e', 'm'];
let mut iter = slice.chunks(2);
assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['l', 'o']);
assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['r', 'e']);
assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['m']);
assert!(iter.next().is_none());

Returns an iterator over chunk_size elements of the slice at a time. The chunks are mutable slices, and do not overlap. If chunk_size does not divide the length of the slice, then the last chunk will not have length chunk_size.

See exact_chunks_mut for a variant of this iterator that returns chunks of always exactly chunk_size elements.

Panics

Panics if chunk_size is 0.

Examples

let v = &mut [0, 0, 0, 0, 0];
let mut count = 1;

for chunk in v.chunks_mut(2) {
    for elem in chunk.iter_mut() {
        *elem += count;
    }
    count += 1;
}
assert_eq!(v, &[1, 1, 2, 2, 3]);

🔬 This is a nightly-only experimental API. (exact_chunks)

Returns an iterator over chunk_size elements of the slice at a time. The chunks are slices and do not overlap. If chunk_size does not divide the length of the slice, then the last up to chunk_size-1 elements will be omitted and can be retrieved from the remainder function of the iterator.

Due to each chunk having exactly chunk_size elements, the compiler can often optimize the resulting code better than in the case of chunks.

Panics

Panics if chunk_size is 0.

Examples

#![feature(exact_chunks)]

let slice = ['l', 'o', 'r', 'e', 'm'];
let mut iter = slice.exact_chunks(2);
assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['l', 'o']);
assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &['r', 'e']);
assert!(iter.next().is_none());

🔬 This is a nightly-only experimental API. (exact_chunks)

Returns an iterator over chunk_size elements of the slice at a time. The chunks are mutable slices, and do not overlap. If chunk_size does not divide the length of the slice, then the last up to chunk_size-1 elements will be omitted and can be retrieved from the into_remainder function of the iterator.

Due to each chunk having exactly chunk_size elements, the compiler can often optimize the resulting code better than in the case of chunks_mut.

Panics

Panics if chunk_size is 0.

Examples

#![feature(exact_chunks)]

let v = &mut [0, 0, 0, 0, 0];
let mut count = 1;

for chunk in v.exact_chunks_mut(2) {
    for elem in chunk.iter_mut() {
        *elem += count;
    }
    count += 1;
}
assert_eq!(v, &[1, 1, 2, 2, 0]);

Divides one slice into two at an index.

The first will contain all indices from [0, mid) (excluding the index mid itself) and the second will contain all indices from [mid, len) (excluding the index len itself).

Panics

Panics if mid > len.

Examples

let v = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6];

{
   let (left, right) = v.split_at(0);
   assert!(left == []);
   assert!(right == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]);
}

{
    let (left, right) = v.split_at(2);
    assert!(left == [1, 2]);
    assert!(right == [3, 4, 5, 6]);
}

{
    let (left, right) = v.split_at(6);
    assert!(left == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]);
    assert!(right == []);
}

Divides one mutable slice into two at an index.

The first will contain all indices from [0, mid) (excluding the index mid itself) and the second will contain all indices from [mid, len) (excluding the index len itself).

Panics

Panics if mid > len.

Examples

let mut v = [1, 0, 3, 0, 5, 6];
// scoped to restrict the lifetime of the borrows
{
    let (left, right) = v.split_at_mut(2);
    assert!(left == [1, 0]);
    assert!(right == [3, 0, 5, 6]);
    left[1] = 2;
    right[1] = 4;
}
assert!(v == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]);

Returns an iterator over subslices separated by elements that match pred. The matched element is not contained in the subslices.

Examples

let slice = [10, 40, 33, 20];
let mut iter = slice.split(|num| num % 3 == 0);

assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[10, 40]);
assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[20]);
assert!(iter.next().is_none());

If the first element is matched, an empty slice will be the first item returned by the iterator. Similarly, if the last element in the slice is matched, an empty slice will be the last item returned by the iterator:

let slice = [10, 40, 33];
let mut iter = slice.split(|num| num % 3 == 0);

assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[10, 40]);
assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[]);
assert!(iter.next().is_none());

If two matched elements are directly adjacent, an empty slice will be present between them:

let slice = [10, 6, 33, 20];
let mut iter = slice.split(|num| num % 3 == 0);

assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[10]);
assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[]);
assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[20]);
assert!(iter.next().is_none());

Returns an iterator over mutable subslices separated by elements that match pred. The matched element is not contained in the subslices.

Examples

let mut v = [10, 40, 30, 20, 60, 50];

for group in v.split_mut(|num| *num % 3 == 0) {
    group[0] = 1;
}
assert_eq!(v, [1, 40, 30, 1, 60, 1]);

Returns an iterator over subslices separated by elements that match pred, starting at the end of the slice and working backwards. The matched element is not contained in the subslices.

Examples

let slice = [11, 22, 33, 0, 44, 55];
let mut iter = slice.rsplit(|num| *num == 0);

assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[44, 55]);
assert_eq!(iter.next().unwrap(), &[11, 22, 33]);
assert_eq!(iter.next(), None);

As with split(), if the first or last element is matched, an empty slice will be the first (or last) item returned by the iterator.

let v = &[0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8];
let mut it = v.rsplit(|n| *n % 2 == 0);
assert_eq!(it.next().unwrap(), &[]);
assert_eq!(it.next().unwrap(), &[3, 5]);
assert_eq!(it.next().unwrap(), &[1, 1]);
assert_eq!(it.next().unwrap(), &[]);
assert_eq!(it.next(), None);

Returns an iterator over mutable subslices separated by elements that match pred, starting at the end of the slice and working backwards. The matched element is not contained in the subslices.

Examples

let mut v = [100, 400, 300, 200, 600, 500];

let mut count = 0;
for group in v.rsplit_mut(|num| *num % 3 == 0) {
    count += 1;
    group[0] = count;
}
assert_eq!(v, [3, 400, 300, 2, 600, 1]);

Returns an iterator over subslices separated by elements that match pred, limited to returning at most n items. The matched element is not contained in the subslices.

The last element returned, if any, will contain the remainder of the slice.

Examples

Print the slice split once by numbers divisible by 3 (i.e. [10, 40], [20, 60, 50]):

let v = [10, 40, 30, 20, 60, 50];

for group in v.splitn(2, |num| *num % 3 == 0) {
    println!("{:?}", group);
}

Returns an iterator over subslices separated by elements that match pred, limited to returning at most n items. The matched element is not contained in the subslices.

The last element returned, if any, will contain the remainder of the slice.

Examples

let mut v = [10, 40, 30, 20, 60, 50];

for group in v.splitn_mut(2, |num| *num % 3 == 0) {
    group[0] = 1;
}
assert_eq!(v, [1, 40, 30, 1, 60, 50]);

Returns an iterator over subslices separated by elements that match pred limited to returning at most n items. This starts at the end of the slice and works backwards. The matched element is not contained in the subslices.

The last element returned, if any, will contain the remainder of the slice.

Examples

Print the slice split once, starting from the end, by numbers divisible by 3 (i.e. [50], [10, 40, 30, 20]):

let v = [10, 40, 30, 20, 60, 50];

for group in v.rsplitn(2, |num| *num % 3 == 0) {
    println!("{:?}", group);
}

Returns an iterator over subslices separated by elements that match pred limited to returning at most n items. This starts at the end of the slice and works backwards. The matched element is not contained in the subslices.

The last element returned, if any, will contain the remainder of the slice.

Examples

let mut s = [10, 40, 30, 20, 60, 50];

for group in s.rsplitn_mut(2, |num| *num % 3 == 0) {
    group[0] = 1;
}
assert_eq!(s, [1, 40, 30, 20, 60, 1]);

Returns true if the slice contains an element with the given value.

Examples

let v = [10, 40, 30];
assert!(v.contains(&30));
assert!(!v.contains(&50));

Returns true if needle is a prefix of the slice.

Examples

let v = [10, 40, 30];
assert!(v.starts_with(&[10]));
assert!(v.starts_with(&[10, 40]));
assert!(!v.starts_with(&[50]));
assert!(!v.starts_with(&[10, 50]));

Always returns true if needle is an empty slice:

let v = &[10, 40, 30];
assert!(v.starts_with(&[]));
let v: &[u8] = &[];
assert!(v.starts_with(&[]));

Returns true if needle is a suffix of the slice.

Examples

let v = [10, 40, 30];
assert!(v.ends_with(&[30]));
assert!(v.ends_with(&[40, 30]));
assert!(!v.ends_with(&[50]));
assert!(!v.ends_with(&[50, 30]));

Always returns true if needle is an empty slice:

let v = &[10, 40, 30];
assert!(v.ends_with(&[]));
let v: &[u8] = &[];
assert!(v.ends_with(&[]));

Binary searches this sorted slice for a given element.

If the value is found then Ok is returned, containing the index of the matching element; if the value is not found then Err is returned, containing the index where a matching element could be inserted while maintaining sorted order.

Examples

Looks up a series of four elements. The first is found, with a uniquely determined position; the second and third are not found; the fourth could match any position in [1, 4].

let s = [0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55];

assert_eq!(s.binary_search(&13),  Ok(9));
assert_eq!(s.binary_search(&4),   Err(7));
assert_eq!(s.binary_search(&100), Err(13));
let r = s.binary_search(&1);
assert!(match r { Ok(1..=4) => true, _ => false, });

Binary searches this sorted slice with a comparator function.

The comparator function should implement an order consistent with the sort order of the underlying slice, returning an order code that indicates whether its argument is Less, Equal or Greater the desired target.

If a matching value is found then returns Ok, containing the index for the matched element; if no match is found then Err is returned, containing the index where a matching element could be inserted while maintaining sorted order.

Examples

Looks up a series of four elements. The first is found, with a uniquely determined position; the second and third are not found; the fourth could match any position in [1, 4].

let s = [0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55];

let seek = 13;
assert_eq!(s.binary_search_by(|probe| probe.cmp(&seek)), Ok(9));
let seek = 4;
assert_eq!(s.binary_search_by(|probe| probe.cmp(&seek)), Err(7));
let seek = 100;
assert_eq!(s.binary_search_by(|probe| probe.cmp(&seek)), Err(13));
let seek = 1;
let r = s.binary_search_by(|probe| probe.cmp(&seek));
assert!(match r { Ok(1..=4) => true, _ => false, });

Binary searches this sorted slice with a key extraction function.

Assumes that the slice is sorted by the key, for instance with sort_by_key using the same key extraction function.

If a matching value is found then returns Ok, containing the index for the matched element; if no match is found then Err is returned, containing the index where a matching element could be inserted while maintaining sorted order.

Examples

Looks up a series of four elements in a slice of pairs sorted by their second elements. The first is found, with a uniquely determined position; the second and third are not found; the fourth could match any position in [1, 4].

let s = [(0, 0), (2, 1), (4, 1), (5, 1), (3, 1),
         (1, 2), (2, 3), (4, 5), (5, 8), (3, 13),
         (1, 21), (2, 34), (4, 55)];

assert_eq!(s.binary_search_by_key(&13, |&(a,b)| b),  Ok(9));
assert_eq!(s.binary_search_by_key(&4, |&(a,b)| b),   Err(7));
assert_eq!(s.binary_search_by_key(&100, |&(a,b)| b), Err(13));
let r = s.binary_search_by_key(&1, |&(a,b)| b);
assert!(match r { Ok(1..=4) => true, _ => false, });

Sorts the slice, but may not preserve the order of equal elements.

This sort is unstable (i.e. may reorder equal elements), in-place (i.e. does not allocate), and O(n log n) worst-case.

Current implementation

The current algorithm is based on pattern-defeating quicksort by Orson Peters, which combines the fast average case of randomized quicksort with the fast worst case of heapsort, while achieving linear time on slices with certain patterns. It uses some randomization to avoid degenerate cases, but with a fixed seed to always provide deterministic behavior.

It is typically faster than stable sorting, except in a few special cases, e.g. when the slice consists of several concatenated sorted sequences.

Examples

let mut v = [-5, 4, 1, -3, 2];

v.sort_unstable();
assert!(v == [-5, -3, 1, 2, 4]);

Sorts the slice with a comparator function, but may not preserve the order of equal elements.

This sort is unstable (i.e. may reorder equal elements), in-place (i.e. does not allocate), and O(n log n) worst-case.

Current implementation

The current algorithm is based on pattern-defeating quicksort by Orson Peters, which combines the fast average case of randomized quicksort with the fast worst case of heapsort, while achieving linear time on slices with certain patterns. It uses some randomization to avoid degenerate cases, but with a fixed seed to always provide deterministic behavior.

It is typically faster than stable sorting, except in a few special cases, e.g. when the slice consists of several concatenated sorted sequences.

Examples

let mut v = [5, 4, 1, 3, 2];
v.sort_unstable_by(|a, b| a.cmp(b));
assert!(v == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]);

// reverse sorting
v.sort_unstable_by(|a, b| b.cmp(a));
assert!(v == [5, 4, 3, 2, 1]);

Sorts the slice with a key extraction function, but may not preserve the order of equal elements.

This sort is unstable (i.e. may reorder equal elements), in-place (i.e. does not allocate), and O(m n log(m n)) worst-case, where the key function is O(m).

Current implementation

The current algorithm is based on pattern-defeating quicksort by Orson Peters, which combines the fast average case of randomized quicksort with the fast worst case of heapsort, while achieving linear time on slices with certain patterns. It uses some randomization to avoid degenerate cases, but with a fixed seed to always provide deterministic behavior.

Examples

let mut v = [-5i32, 4, 1, -3, 2];

v.sort_unstable_by_key(|k| k.abs());
assert!(v == [1, 2, -3, 4, -5]);

Rotates the slice in-place such that the first mid elements of the slice move to the end while the last self.len() - mid elements move to the front. After calling rotate_left, the element previously at index mid will become the first element in the slice.

Panics

This function will panic if mid is greater than the length of the slice. Note that mid == self.len() does not panic and is a no-op rotation.

Complexity

Takes linear (in self.len()) time.

Examples

let mut a = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f'];
a.rotate_left(2);
assert_eq!(a, ['c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'a', 'b']);

Rotating a subslice:

let mut a = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f'];
a[1..5].rotate_left(1);
assert_eq!(a, ['a', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'b', 'f']);

Rotates the slice in-place such that the first self.len() - k elements of the slice move to the end while the last k elements move to the front. After calling rotate_right, the element previously at index self.len() - k will become the first element in the slice.

Panics

This function will panic if k is greater than the length of the slice. Note that k == self.len() does not panic and is a no-op rotation.

Complexity

Takes linear (in self.len()) time.

Examples

let mut a = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f'];
a.rotate_right(2);
assert_eq!(a, ['e', 'f', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd']);

Rotate a subslice:

let mut a = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f'];
a[1..5].rotate_right(1);
assert_eq!(a, ['a', 'e', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'f']);

Copies the elements from src into self.

The length of src must be the same as self.

If src implements Copy, it can be more performant to use copy_from_slice.

Panics

This function will panic if the two slices have different lengths.

Examples

Cloning two elements from a slice into another:

let src = [1, 2, 3, 4];
let mut dst = [0, 0];

// Because the slices have to be the same length,
// we slice the source slice from four elements
// to two. It will panic if we don't do this.
dst.clone_from_slice(&src[2..]);

assert_eq!(src, [1, 2, 3, 4]);
assert_eq!(dst, [3, 4]);

Rust enforces that there can only be one mutable reference with no immutable references to a particular piece of data in a particular scope. Because of this, attempting to use clone_from_slice on a single slice will result in a compile failure:

This example deliberately fails to compile
let mut slice = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];

slice[..2].clone_from_slice(&slice[3..]); // compile fail!

To work around this, we can use split_at_mut to create two distinct sub-slices from a slice:

let mut slice = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];

{
    let (left, right) = slice.split_at_mut(2);
    left.clone_from_slice(&right[1..]);
}

assert_eq!(slice, [4, 5, 3, 4, 5]);

Copies all elements from src into self, using a memcpy.

The length of src must be the same as self.

If src does not implement Copy, use clone_from_slice.

Panics

This function will panic if the two slices have different lengths.

Examples

Copying two elements from a slice into another:

let src = [1, 2, 3, 4];
let mut dst = [0, 0];

// Because the slices have to be the same length,
// we slice the source slice from four elements
// to two. It will panic if we don't do this.
dst.copy_from_slice(&src[2..]);

assert_eq!(src, [1, 2, 3, 4]);
assert_eq!(dst, [3, 4]);

Rust enforces that there can only be one mutable reference with no immutable references to a particular piece of data in a particular scope. Because of this, attempting to use copy_from_slice on a single slice will result in a compile failure:

This example deliberately fails to compile
let mut slice = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];

slice[..2].copy_from_slice(&slice[3..]); // compile fail!

To work around this, we can use split_at_mut to create two distinct sub-slices from a slice:

let mut slice = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];

{
    let (left, right) = slice.split_at_mut(2);
    left.copy_from_slice(&right[1..]);
}

assert_eq!(slice, [4, 5, 3, 4, 5]);

Swaps all elements in self with those in other.

The length of other must be the same as self.

Panics

This function will panic if the two slices have different lengths.

Example

Swapping two elements across slices:

let mut slice1 = [0, 0];
let mut slice2 = [1, 2, 3, 4];

slice1.swap_with_slice(&mut slice2[2..]);

assert_eq!(slice1, [3, 4]);
assert_eq!(slice2, [1, 2, 0, 0]);

Rust enforces that there can only be one mutable reference to a particular piece of data in a particular scope. Because of this, attempting to use swap_with_slice on a single slice will result in a compile failure:

This example deliberately fails to compile
let mut slice = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
slice[..2].swap_with_slice(&mut slice[3..]); // compile fail!

To work around this, we can use split_at_mut to create two distinct mutable sub-slices from a slice:

let mut slice = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];

{
    let (left, right) = slice.split_at_mut(2);
    left.swap_with_slice(&mut right[1..]);
}

assert_eq!(slice, [4, 5, 3, 1, 2]);

🔬 This is a nightly-only experimental API. (slice_align_to)

Transmute the slice to a slice of another type, ensuring aligment of the types is maintained.

This method splits the slice into three distinct slices: prefix, correctly aligned middle slice of a new type, and the suffix slice. The middle slice will have the greatest length possible for a given type and input slice.

This method has no purpose when either input element T or output element U are zero-sized and will return the original slice without splitting anything.

Unsafety

This method is essentially a transmute with respect to the elements in the returned middle slice, so all the usual caveats pertaining to transmute::<T, U> also apply here.

Examples

Basic usage:

unsafe {
    let bytes: [u8; 7] = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7];
    let (prefix, shorts, suffix) = bytes.align_to::<u16>();
    // less_efficient_algorithm_for_bytes(prefix);
    // more_efficient_algorithm_for_aligned_shorts(shorts);
    // less_efficient_algorithm_for_bytes(suffix);
}

🔬 This is a nightly-only experimental API. (slice_align_to)

Transmute the slice to a slice of another type, ensuring aligment of the types is maintained.

This method splits the slice into three distinct slices: prefix, correctly aligned middle slice of a new type, and the suffix slice. The middle slice will have the greatest length possible for a given type and input slice.

This method has no purpose when either input element T or output element U are zero-sized and will return the original slice without splitting anything.

Unsafety

This method is essentially a transmute with respect to the elements in the returned middle slice, so all the usual caveats pertaining to transmute::<T, U> also apply here.

Examples

Basic usage:

unsafe {
    let mut bytes: [u8; 7] = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7];
    let (prefix, shorts, suffix) = bytes.align_to_mut::<u16>();
    // less_efficient_algorithm_for_bytes(prefix);
    // more_efficient_algorithm_for_aligned_shorts(shorts);
    // less_efficient_algorithm_for_bytes(suffix);
}

Trait Implementations

impl<P: Debug + Pixel, Container: Debug> Debug for ImageBuffer<P, Container>
[src]

Formats the value using the given formatter. Read more

impl<P, Container> Deref for ImageBuffer<P, Container> where
    P: Pixel + 'static,
    P::Subpixel: 'static,
    Container: Deref<Target = [P::Subpixel]>, 
[src]

The resulting type after dereferencing.

Dereferences the value.

impl<P, Container> DerefMut for ImageBuffer<P, Container> where
    P: Pixel + 'static,
    P::Subpixel: 'static,
    Container: Deref<Target = [P::Subpixel]> + DerefMut
[src]

Mutably dereferences the value.

impl<P, Container> Index<(u32, u32)> for ImageBuffer<P, Container> where
    P: Pixel + 'static,
    P::Subpixel: 'static,
    Container: Deref<Target = [P::Subpixel]>, 
[src]

The returned type after indexing.

Performs the indexing (container[index]) operation.

impl<P, Container> IndexMut<(u32, u32)> for ImageBuffer<P, Container> where
    P: Pixel + 'static,
    P::Subpixel: 'static,
    Container: Deref<Target = [P::Subpixel]> + DerefMut
[src]

Performs the mutable indexing (container[index]) operation.

impl<P, Container> Clone for ImageBuffer<P, Container> where
    P: Pixel,
    Container: Deref<Target = [P::Subpixel]> + Clone
[src]

Returns a copy of the value. Read more

Performs copy-assignment from source. Read more

impl<P, Container> GenericImage for ImageBuffer<P, Container> where
    P: Pixel + 'static,
    Container: Deref<Target = [P::Subpixel]> + DerefMut,
    P::Subpixel: 'static, 
[src]

The type of pixel.

The width and height of this image.

The bounding rectangle of this image.

Returns the pixel located at (x, y) Read more

Puts a pixel at location (x, y) Read more

Returns the pixel located at (x, y), ignoring bounds checking.

Put a pixel at location (x, y) Read more

Puts a pixel at location (x, y), ignoring bounds checking.

Put a pixel at location (x, y), taking into account alpha channels

DEPRECATED: This method will be removed. Blend the pixel directly instead.

The width of this image.

The height of this image.

Returns true if this x, y coordinate is contained inside the image.

Important traits for Pixels<'a, I>

Returns an Iterator over the pixels of this image. The iterator yields the coordinates of each pixel along with their value Read more

Important traits for MutPixels<'a, I>

Returns an Iterator over mutable pixels of this image. The iterator yields the coordinates of each pixel along with a mutable reference to them. Read more

Copies all of the pixels from another image into this image. Read more

Returns a subimage that is a view into this image.

impl<'a, 'b, Container, FromType: Pixel + 'static, ToType: Pixel + 'static> ConvertBuffer<ImageBuffer<ToType, Vec<ToType::Subpixel>>> for ImageBuffer<FromType, Container> where
    Container: Deref<Target = [FromType::Subpixel]>,
    ToType: FromColor<FromType>,
    FromType::Subpixel: 'static,
    ToType::Subpixel: 'static, 
[src]

Converts self to a buffer of type T Read more

Auto Trait Implementations

impl<P, Container> Send for ImageBuffer<P, Container> where
    Container: Send,
    P: Send

impl<P, Container> Sync for ImageBuffer<P, Container> where
    Container: Sync,
    P: Sync